The 4 Most Unanswered Questions about Health

Senior Care: Recognizing the Signs That Need Assisted Living Caring for our loved one with dementia can be both challenging and daunting for the caregiver and the entire family, so many families are considering assisted living. But how can one recognize the signs that it’s time to send your loved one in a senior care or assisted living facility? In this article, we will help you on how to best recognize the signs to know when is the best time to choose senior care or assisted living for your loved one. According to Alzheimer’s Association, millions of Americans are so much devoting their time and energy to caring for their loved ones suffering from dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, but there are times when caregivers are just so stressed and burn out along with the high cost of caregiving that all lead to lack of care, emotional turmoil, and burden. Some of the signs that are indicative of needing professional help include aggression, caregiver stress, escalating care needs, compromised safety, sundowning syndrome, and patient anxiety and stress. As a family, it is really tough to make a decision of sending your loved one with dementia in an assisted living facility, but this is th best option especially if your abilities as a caregiver is far lesser than what your loved one needs, which can only put your health and your loved ones at a higher risk. Is your love one with Alzheimer’s disease safe with the design and the type of amenities in your current home? Just to remind you that dementia and Alzheimer’s disease are both degenerative conditions, wherein the signs deteriorate and become worse over time, so your loved one will have escalating needs that need to be addressed and you won’t be able to handle them alone. The term sundowners syndrome refers to a very agitated behavior wherein the signs become more pronounced later in the day, which is a common characteristic sign of Alzheimer’s disease. This sign can severely disrupt your family routines and can take a heavy toll on you as a caregiver, so it is best to let your loved one with Alzheimer’s disease be handled by professionals in an assisted living facility. In the later stages of Alzheimers disease and dementia, there is a high risk posed by wandering because your loved one may wander even if you just take time to go to the bathroom, increasing likelihood of injuries and falls. Caregivers caring for their loved ones with dementia or Alzheimers may experience symptoms such as avoidance behaviors, disabling anxiety, hypervigilance and intrusive thoughts according to New York Times, and these can put a lot of pressure for the caregiver that can normal disrupt sleeping and eating patterns.A Quick Rundown of Health

A Brief History of Health

Leave a Comment